We love designing complex colloidal particles

 

We have an in-depth knowledge of heterogeneous polymerization techniques, such as emulsion and mini-emulsion polymerizations, to develop a plethora of complex polymer-based colloids. We recently have expanded our particle synthesis and characterization portfolio to inorganic colloids, such as silicates, metal oxides and calcium carbonate.

 

 
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	mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}     In our  2015  paper entitled  Fabrication of calcium phosphate microcapsules using emulsion droplets stabilized with branched copolymers as templates  published in  Journal of Materials Chemistry B  we report on a versatile and time-efficient method to fabricate calcium phosphate (CaP) microcapsules. The branched copolymer was designed to provide a suitable architecture and functionality to produce stable emulsion droplets, and to permit the mineralization of CaP at the surface of the oil droplet when incubated in a solution containing calcium and phosphate ions. The CaP shells of the microcapsules were established to be calcium deficient hydroxyapatite with incorporated chlorine and carbonate species. These capsule walls were made fluorescent by decoration with a fluorescein–bisphosphonate conjugate. The images above are  SEM micrographs  illustrating the mineralization of CaP at the surface of oil droplets stabilized with BCP. (A) Incubation periods of 0 hours (scale bar = 37 µm), (B) 48 hours (scale bar = 16 µm), (C) 60 hours (scale bar = 7 µm), (D and E) 72 hours (scale bars = 23 µm and 7 µm, respectively), (F) surface morphology of CaP capsule (scale bar = 704 nm), (G) CaP capsules annealed at 600 oC (scale bar = 2 µm), (H) surface morphology of CaP capsule after annealing at 600 oC (scale bar = 648 nm), and (I and J) shell thickness of the CaP capsules before annealing (scale bars = 1 µm and 540 nm, respectively). You can read the (open access) paper here:  http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/C5TB00893J .

In our 2015 paper entitled Fabrication of calcium phosphate microcapsules using emulsion droplets stabilized with branched copolymers as templates published in Journal of Materials Chemistry B we report on a versatile and time-efficient method to fabricate calcium phosphate (CaP) microcapsules. The branched copolymer was designed to provide a suitable architecture and functionality to produce stable emulsion droplets, and to permit the mineralization of CaP at the surface of the oil droplet when incubated in a solution containing calcium and phosphate ions. The CaP shells of the microcapsules were established to be calcium deficient hydroxyapatite with incorporated chlorine and carbonate species. These capsule walls were made fluorescent by decoration with a fluorescein–bisphosphonate conjugate. The images above are SEM micrographs illustrating the mineralization of CaP at the surface of oil droplets stabilized with BCP. (A) Incubation periods of 0 hours (scale bar = 37 µm), (B) 48 hours (scale bar = 16 µm), (C) 60 hours (scale bar = 7 µm), (D and E) 72 hours (scale bars = 23 µm and 7 µm, respectively), (F) surface morphology of CaP capsule (scale bar = 704 nm), (G) CaP capsules annealed at 600 oC (scale bar = 2 µm), (H) surface morphology of CaP capsule after annealing at 600 oC (scale bar = 648 nm), and (I and J) shell thickness of the CaP capsules before annealing (scale bars = 1 µm and 540 nm, respectively). You can read the (open access) paper here: http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/C5TB00893J.