Pickering stabilization - particles can adhere to soft interfaces.

 

The phenomenon that particles can adhere to soft interfaces is known as Pickering stabilization. Over the last decade we have studied the behavior of particles at liquid-liquid interfaces, and we have used Pickering stabilization to develop the processes of Pickering mini-emulsion polymerization and Pickering emulsion polymerization. We also have used the ability for particles to adhere to interfaces as a tool to make more complex supracolloidal structures, such as Pickering high internal phase emulsion solid polymer and gel-based monoliths.

 

 
There has been much scientific interest in the behaviour of colloidal particles at liquid interfaces. From a research aspect they provide model systems for fundamental studies of condensed matter physics. From a commercial aspect they provide applications for making new materials in the cosmetics, food and paint industries.  In many cases of colloidal particles at interfaces, the mechanism of particle interactions is still unknown.  Particle-Stabilized Emulsions and Colloids , available from the RSC from  January 2015  looks at recent studies on the behaviour of particles at liquid interfaces. The book first introduces the basic concepts and principles of colloidal particles at liquid-liquid interfaces including the interactions and conformations. The  book  then discusses the latest advances in emulsions and bicontinuous emulsions stabilized by both solid and soft particles and finally the  book  covers applications in food science and oil extraction.  With contributions from leading experts in these fields, this  book  will provide a background to academic researchers, engineers, and graduate students in chemistry, physics and materials science. The commercial aspects will also be of interest to those working in the cosmetics, food and oil industry.

There has been much scientific interest in the behaviour of colloidal particles at liquid interfaces. From a research aspect they provide model systems for fundamental studies of condensed matter physics. From a commercial aspect they provide applications for making new materials in the cosmetics, food and paint industries.

In many cases of colloidal particles at interfaces, the mechanism of particle interactions is still unknown. Particle-Stabilized Emulsions and Colloids, available from the RSC from January 2015 looks at recent studies on the behaviour of particles at liquid interfaces. The book first introduces the basic concepts and principles of colloidal particles at liquid-liquid interfaces including the interactions and conformations. The book then discusses the latest advances in emulsions and bicontinuous emulsions stabilized by both solid and soft particles and finally the book covers applications in food science and oil extraction.

With contributions from leading experts in these fields, this book will provide a background to academic researchers, engineers, and graduate students in chemistry, physics and materials science. The commercial aspects will also be of interest to those working in the cosmetics, food and oil industry.

This image is taken from  one of our latest papers , entitled  Equilibrium orientations of non-spherical and chemically anisotropic particles at liquid–liquid interfaces and the effect on emulsion stability,  on modelling the behavior of anisotropic Janus particles at oil-water interfaces. The  paper  was published in  March 2015  in the  Journal of Colloid and Interface Science.  Top: Janus ellipsoids with aspect ratio of 0.4 from left to right Xplane = 0, 0.5, −0.5 in the xy plane and Xplane = 0, 0.5, −0.5 in the xzplane. Middle: escape energy for polystyrene-poly(HEMA) Janus ellipsoids (aspect ratio = 0.4) of varying Janus character either intersected in the xy plane (squares) or the xz plane (triangles). The colour of the point represents that the minimum energy for escape is into the oil phase (red) or aqueous phase (black).   σHD/water = 53.5 mN m−1, σHD/PSt = 14 mN m−1, σwater/PSt = 32 mN m−1,σHD/PHEMA = 18 mN m−1, σwater/PHEMA = 12 mN m−1 either calculated from the polymer surface energy or taken from literature. Bottom: free energy profile for Xplane = 0 in the xy axis (left) and xz axis (right). The grey circles show minima in the free energy profile. (For interpretation of the references to colour in this figure legend, the reader is referred to the web version of this article.)

This image is taken from one of our latest papers, entitled Equilibrium orientations of non-spherical and chemically anisotropic particles at liquid–liquid interfaces and the effect on emulsion stability, on modelling the behavior of anisotropic Janus particles at oil-water interfaces. The paper was published in March 2015 in the Journal of Colloid and Interface Science. Top: Janus ellipsoids with aspect ratio of 0.4 from left to right Xplane = 0, 0.5, −0.5 in the xy plane and Xplane = 0, 0.5, −0.5 in the xzplane. Middle: escape energy for polystyrene-poly(HEMA) Janus ellipsoids (aspect ratio = 0.4) of varying Janus character either intersected in the xy plane (squares) or the xz plane (triangles). The colour of the point represents that the minimum energy for escape is into the oil phase (red) or aqueous phase (black). 

σHD/water = 53.5 mN m−1, σHD/PSt = 14 mN m−1, σwater/PSt = 32 mN m−1,σHD/PHEMA = 18 mN m−1, σwater/PHEMA = 12 mN m−1 either calculated from the polymer surface energy or taken from literature. Bottom: free energy profile for Xplane = 0 in the xy axis (left) and xz axis (right). The grey circles show minima in the free energy profile. (For interpretation of the references to colour in this figure legend, the reader is referred to the web version of this article.)